Tag Archives: Claude Monet

The Life and Paintings of the Famous Painter Claude Monet

The Impressionist Mastermind: Claude Monet

Claude Monet is considered to be the sole leader and prime innovator of impressionism – the 19th century art movement. He managed to capture, on canvas, the vivid beauty of nature in a manner of style that was vibrant and largely self-generated. Monet, since day one, aspired to capture the true essence of nature with his work and, keeping his brilliant paintings in mind, the world agrees he was quite successful at that. His subjects included scenes from his beloved garden to urban scenarios. Throughout his rather rebellious career, he never conformed to the conventional ways of painting. Monet was the greatest summit of uniqueness when it came to the art movement of impressionism.Claude-Monet-paintings

Biography of Claude Monet

Early Life of Claude Monet

Born in Paris on the 14th of November 1840, Claude Monet opened his eyes to a world developing as rapid as a speeding bullet. His family left the bold Parisian neighborhood soon after his birth and made their move to Le Havre. Le Havre was where he was brought up. Monet’s father used to dream that his son would make himself a successful grocer but, little did he know, what the young artist had in stock for the world.

Claude Monet’s Interest in Art

Young Claude Monet’s interest was in art and art alone. He knew he wanted to become an artist since his childhood. He made quite a name for himself making charcoal impressions in Le Havre while growing up. Earning the first of his earnings from these caricatures was a rite of passage for Monet. Ever since he started earning, (by selling his charcoal caricatures) he was largely motivated to pursue his passion for art at a much more serious scale. As soon as his father discovered of his career choice, he stopped financing him and he was reduced to survive on the money he saved from his selling his early works.Claude-Monet-tulip-fields

Later Years – Developing A Unique Style

Teenage Monet paid a visit to Paris in 1857. He spent most of his time there in the Louvre Museum of Art. He looked upon the works of the old masters with respect and drew great inspiration from them but, he was never really satisfied with the idea of imitating them. He wanted to draw something natural. He’d rather opt out painting a simple scene of a Parisian street through an open window than choose a complex concept. By early 1861, he joined the armed forces of France and served for two years after which, he fell ill. He was discharged from the force due to his illness. He focused only on pursuing art as a career from then onwards.

Claude Monet Marriage With Camille

He got married at the age of thirty, in 1870. A war between France and Prussia broke shortly after he was wed to Camille Doncieux. The war made him leave his homeland in terror and he settled in London. He was stationed at London for quite a while after which he went to Holland and spent some of his time there before finally returning to France and his beloved Paris. He made a permanent settlement for his family close to the river Seine: a place that enable him to stay in close contact with his contemporaries: Auguste Renoir, Sisley, Gustave and Manet.

The Birth Of Impressionism

In April 1874, the first ever ‘impressionist’ exhibition was held. The term ‘impressionist’ was used by a famous art critic who was attending the exhibition. He argued that the paintings aren’t a true sketch of what was intended but are only an impression – with their rough lines and inconsistent colorations. Monet and the gang took the term as an appropriate label for their art and finally, this unique form of art  (the one Monet was pursuing) found a name for itself.Claude-Monet-Flower-Paintings

Claude Monet’s Garden: The Inspiration Behind Water Lilies

Monet become a highly esteemed and popular artist by the turn of the century. He started earning quite a handsome living. A large chunk of his money went into developing his formal garden which he had made at his land in Giverny. This garden was then to become the sole inspiration behind one of his most famous series works: water lilies. He loved to sketch scenes from his garden.

Monet’s Legacy

In honor of the Frenchmen who gave up their lives for the good cause in the First World War, Monet painted a series of paintings. Monet, being a former soldier himself, felt greatly for the ones who died and dedicated his series of weeping willow paintings to them. Soon after the war concluded, Monet developed a disease of the eye. He was surgically treated for it and had the cataracts of his eyes removed and became disabled. Even that did not bring him down from doing what he loved. He continued to paint with his disability and managed to coin new techniques and further developed his unique style.

Claude Monet is a name that the art world would cherish through many ages to come. He was one of the greatest – if not THE greatest – painters of the modern world. The art he produced was truly something he could call his own. Throughout this broad career of his, he kept innovating; providing fertile soil for the seed of impressionism to grow into the mightiest of trees.

Most Famous Paintings By Claude Monet

Let’s have a look at most famous paintings by Claude Monet

You can buy Master Piece reproduction by Claude Monet here.

Impression, Sunrise

Claude-Monet-impression-sunriseThis piece of work is a classic example of the kind of things Monet preferred to paint. Impression, Sunrise is the view of the Le Havre harbour from out of one of Monet’s residence windows. This painting was revealed to the masses on the first ever impressionist exhibition held in 1874. For lack of a better name, Monet chose to name it “Impression soliel levant” (which translates to impression, sunrise) in haste. An art critic, who wasn’t very fond of the things he saw in this exhibition, keeping the name of this painting in mind, used the term “Impressionism” for the first time describing Monet and his contemporaries work. From this very painting the name of the great art movement was coined.

Camille

Claude-Monet-Camille-MonetMonet’s famous model (who he married later on), Camille is shown posing in this majestic work. AlongsideCamille’, she is seen in many other works of the French artists namely: “On the Bank of the Seine”, “The Woman in the Garden”, Bennecourt and more. Monet’s Camille (also known as: “The Woman in the Green Dress” or “La femme à la robe verte”) made him a great deal famous among the folk of his time.

Water Lilies

‘Water Lilies’ is a large series of paintings (consisting of approximately 250 paintings) Monet made, capturing the serene beauty of his formal garden (situated at his land in Giverny). He loved his garden and this project was something very dear to Monet. Thus the large format and eccentric enthusiasm he painted these paintings with. The purpose of these paintings was to give the viewer a complete experience of the unrelenting grace of nature. His garden, with its pond containing water lilies, was an appropriate subject in order for the idea’s execution. Monet showed how the sunlight changes throughout the day in this series.

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Death of Claude Monet

Never did he cease making these paintings better. He was determined to improve them till the very end of his own being. A year after his demise, in 1927, 22 out of 200+ paintings from this series (hand picked by Monet before his death) were exhibited in a public display.

Top 10 Oil Paintings Of Motherhood

Mother and Child Oil Paintings

Motherhood is one of the holiest of virtues that humankind has excelled to. It is believed in many religions that a mother’s love is the closest to God’s love. Despite the religious clause, motherhood had always, in all societies new and old, been considered a high calling. It is a full-fledged, painstaking job that has always been free of any monetary reward for the mothers. Still they have taken great care of their children and showered unconditional love and affection on them throughout the ages.

George Washington, first president of the United States of America is reported to have said the following about his mother:

My mother was the most beautiful woman I ever saw. All I am I owe to my mother. I attribute all my success in life to the moral, intellectual and physical education I received from her.

Famous Oil Paintings of Mother and Child

Let us celebrate the glory of maternity all around the world today; let us rejoice in the name of motherhood and the grandest gift it brings: the miracle of life. Let us honor the care-takers of the children of the earth with this list of top 10 paintings of motherhood. The list features some exquisite oil on canvas masterpieces from legendary artists such as: Vincent Van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Gustav Klimt and on the top of our list, Claude Monet.

Top Ten Oil Paintings of Motherhood

Here’s our list of top 10 oil paintings of motherhood:

1) Claude Monet’s Poppy Field in Argenteuil

Claude-Monet-poppy-fieldPoppy Field in Argenteuil uncovers Claude Monet’s love for rich color. He finished painting it in 1873. The master artist creates a tasty contrast between the lush green of the meadows and the haunting crimson red of the wild flowers.

Monet painted this painting in the wild poppy fields right outside the suburbs of Paris at a place called Argenteuil. He has captured his wife Camille and his son Jean taking a leisurely stroll together through the grass. Both mother and son occur twice in the painting; on the bottom right (foreground) of the field and in the top right (background) as well.

You can buy this master piece reproduction from ArtGaga.

2) Gustav Klimt’s Mother and Child (or Le tre eta della donna)

Gustav-Kmilt-Mother-ChildThis painting is a part of Gustav Klimt’s very famous series of oil paintings titled: ‘Three Ages of Woman’. Mother and child shows a naked mother holding her young child while they both are asleep. It was painted exactly after three years had passed the death of his son Otto, in the year 1905.

Klimt was more than just an expert at what he did. He was one of the pioneers of the Art Nouveau (or New Art) movement which, in the near future, became the very foundation of all modern art works. He lead the Austrian group of Art Nouveau artists called the Vienna Secession and was it’s first president. His paintings, including Mother and Child, were marked by sensual content. His subjects were mostly in the nude.

3) Mary Cassatt’s Breakfast in Bed

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Mary Cassatt has to her belt this beautiful work of art dubbed: Breakfast in bed. It was created back in 1897 by the American born artist. The subjects of the painting being a mother and her child. Motherhood has been the theme to many of Cassatt’s paintings. In Breakfast in bed, the mother is holding her child in her warm, motherly embrace as the child has his eyes locked upon the breakfast lying on the mother’s bedside table.

Have a look at this beautiful massai wall hanging.

4) Vincent Van Gogh’s First Steps

first steps

To this day, Vincent Van Gogh’s First Steps is remembered as one of his most brilliant works. A precious atmosphere of familial unity is created employing the use of a balanced scheme of color (which is characteristic of all of his final works). The painting is a copy of a masterful painting by the great artist Jean Francois Millet.

Van Gogh finished twenty one finely crafted copies of Millet’s masterpiece while he was staying at Saint Remy’s asylum in between 1889 – 1890. The painting encloses the artist’s ultimate passion within it for Van Gogh always dreamed of having a family (a wife and son) of his own but, unfortunately, he never had one.

Have a look at Master Reproduction of ‘Woman Picking Olives’ by Vincent Van Gogh.

5) Pablo Picasso’s Maternity

pablo-picasso-maternity

Pablo Picasso, the Spanish maestro himself, painted this stunningly beautiful painting back in 1905. The subjects of the painting are a mother and her child and a deep bond between them is depicted: a beautiful mother, dressed in a bright, heavenly shade of pink, is breast feeding her newborn child.

Picasso mastered every type of painting he took up. From impressionistic depictions to surrealism et cetera, he painted with great passion and utmost creativity. Maternity is from his famous rose period and is his take on the meditative topic of motherhood.

You can find more master reproductions on woman by Pablo Picasso. Have a look at woman sitting near a window (Femme Assise Pres d’une Fenetre) and Le Lecture, Woman Reading.

6) Claude Monet’s Madame Monet and Her Son

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Monet finished painting this marvelous piece in 1875. Madame Monet and Her Son also has ‘Woman with a Parasol’ attached to the beginning and it forms it’s actual title. His son Jean and wife Camille form the subject for this painting as well. In the movements depicted does the true beauty of this painting lie. The artwork shows the movements of Camille’s long, white-upon-azure-blue, skirt as the winds caress it. Alongside her dress, the wildflowers too are dancing to the rhythm of the winds. So does her buoyant parasol, expressing the wind’s motion.

7) Mary Cassatt’s Summertime:

Mary-Cassatt-SummertimeAnother masterful artwork of Cassatt’s proudly finds its way to our list. Summertime was painted in the summer of 1894, three years before her landmark: Breakfast in Bed. It sketches the beautiful scene of a mother and daughter sitting in a rowing boat, gazing at the ducks passing them by.

Surprisingly, Cassatt wasn’t ever a mother but, she still managed to capture through her paintings, with remarkable precision, the intimate bond between a mother and her child. She is primarily renowned because of the theme she frequently put to use in her paintings, that is, motherhood.

8) Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s Woman with a Parasol and Small Child on a Sunlit Hillside

woman with parasol

The French impressionist master of the art, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, finished this painting back in 1874. Woman with a Parasol and Small Child on a Sunlit Hillside illustrates a very natural scene: a mother lying in the meadows holding her parasol while her toddler drifts away into taller grass.

Have a look at other master piece reproductions by Pierre-Auguste Renoir at ArtGaga.

9)  Gustav Klimt’s Hope II

hope 2

In Gustav Klimt’s Hope II, a pregnant woman is shown with her gaze locked right at her bulging belly. The Viennese artist finished painting this masterpiece in 1908.

Though motherhood has been a common theme for art over the ages, illustrations of pregnancy have been seldom brought to the canvas. With Hope II, Klimt too makes his second appearance on this list of ours.

View a beautiful collection of Kenyan Art at ArtGaga. You can select individual artists unique pieces for your home interior design.

10) Vincent Van Gogh’s Pieta

pieta-1889.jpg!Blog

Vincent Van Gough, during his stay at the Saint-Remy asylum in 1889 created Pieta. Pieta depicts the virgin Mary grieving her dead child’s (Jesus) loss. The atmosphere of lament created in this painting distinguishes it from other work’s of Van Gogh. In addition to the dark, morbid color scheme of the painting, the expressions of the subjects reflect the horror of Jesus’s crucifixion.

The Pros of Oil Painting Reproductions

The world would be a barren, unattractive, and meaningless place if God did not gift it with art. Art indeed itself is a versatile land that fascinates whoever places his steps inside its premises. And because of this versatility, it has given birth to several enthralling artists that their existence became an example to the new talents to come. Da Vinci, Van Gogh, Claude Monet, Frida Kahlo, and many more come under the category of the masters of art. Their paintings are though something that no one can privatize because they are priceless and are worthy to remain in contact with the eyes of onlookers in the museums. Therefore, these masterworks shall not be belonged to one person only. Because the original art work cannot be owned by anyone no matter how wealthy or charming reputation one carries; there comes the need of artists who can reproduce the exact similar paintings for those who are willing to own them.

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Mistakes That Should Be Avoided In Acrylic Painting

In everyday life we hear people say that everybody makes mistakes. No one learns everything from their mother’s womb, so it’s impossible for people not to commit mishaps when entering into a new life or profession. Same goes to the painters who fall into the alluring category of art where people learn through colors and nature. So, if you are starting your career in Acrylic Painting, its far better to comprehend some of the common mistakes that people commit in painting. But never hesitate when you pick up your brush, because only mistakes can teach you and make you perfect.

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A Little About Claude Monet

Claude Monet was a French artist often credited as the founder of the impressionist painting genre. Monet was one of the foremost artists of his generation, and his first masterpiece titled “Impression, Sunrise” is often considered to be one of the most revolutionary works of its kind. Claude Monet was born in France, in the city of Paris, on November 14th 1840.

Monet’s Early Life In Paris

Monet’s infant years were spent in Paris. He was the second son of Adolphe and Louise Monet who were Parisians. He was baptised as Oscar Claude but his parents would call him only Oscar. Monet was born in a catholic family but he later embraced atheism. Monet’s family moved to Normandy in 1845 where his father had managed to set up a moderately successful grocery business, while his mother would go on to train as a singer. Claude was expected to join in on his father’s grocery business when he got older and thus help in expanding it, but Claude had cherished a deep passion for the arts since his early childhood. He really wanted to become a painter and showed great potential. Monet was thus admitted to the Le Havre secondary school for elementary studies in arts, needless to say he was an excellent student. Monet took to painting as a hobby, and in his school days he was forever coming up with charcoal caricatures and paintings that he would then sell in the market for around twenty francs.

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